Thursday, April 26, 2012

Citizens Police Academy 6

This week was all about use of force, whether it is the use of weapons or that of verbal commands it all comes down to use of force. We were told even by showing up in uniform is a form of force by the police department. This makes sense because everyone focuses their attention on the person in uniform in most situations.
 
Our training officer then went into what composes his duty belt. What was shown to us is mostly standard for all police department: baton, flashlight, 2 pairs of cuffs, radio, and the duty weapon. The weapon is a matter of choice for our department. Officers may have their choice of duty weapons as long as it is chambered for 9mm or .45 calibers. It would explain why some officers are carrying 1911s. One of the officers even brought in his AR from his vehicle which was really interesting. Aimpoint had supplied most of the optics for our Police Department and Magpul supplied the iron sights as their backup sights. Other than that they are plain jane AR's and they don't even get to take them out but once a year for qualifications.

The rest of the class (60% of it really) was devoted to Tasers. The officers gave some statistics that after implementing the device that it reduced officer and suspects numerous injuries and that it reduced sick days for officers after using the device (compared to all out brawling with the suspect). It was named after Thomas A. Swift Electric Rifle and was designed by a engineer for NASA (surprising how many cool things come from NASA). The propulsion system is compressed nitrogen and when the trigger is pulled the electricity bursts the nitrogen chamber and send the two harpoons (yes harpoons) on their way. The second thing that happens is that it releases many small pieces of paper containing the serial number of the Taser device called AFIDS(anti-felon identification system). Mostly they look like confetti with numbers on them. This is to help the officers identify which taser was used and assists with the apprehension paperwork later down the line. The officer yells taser three times before deploying the device so that other officers can get clear of the device. Getting tangled up in the leads is a very bad idea as that person will likely be the one getting the shock.

So without futher ado I present the aftermath of our tasering as it were:


4 comments:

  1. MMasse, Okay, so did you become the suspect um...victim in this picture? I'm not sure of the policy where you are,but back where I'm from, if you carry a taser, you experience a taser. Those were the rules. Looks like the class enjoyed themselves :-)

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    1. No such rule for Idaho police, just have to complete the eight hour training block. I have to admit that I did not go through with it. My wife told me under no circumstance you will get tased. She has this unfounded fear of me having a heart attack, so promises were made (I also let her see Stephen's post about his ordeals. Big mistake on my part). I honored her wishes and after seeing some of the other "victims" I am kind of glad I did not step up as it were.

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  2. Holy cow. I have been into all kinds of real life training,, but I think I will stop at being tased.

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    1. Other than the barbs (which were optional) most volunteers said it was not painful. Its like a higher order of the physical therapy they do for atrophy muscles. The only difference is the intensity.

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